Developing the first App for Cretaceous Designs

By David Morrison II

Before you start coding your first android app the best practice states that you should first plan out your app in writing then sketch and lastly storyboard/wireframe so you’ll know what you need to do visually also to help understand the complexity of the program. In my example above I created the storyboard in Adobe Illustrator, why? Since illustrator is a vector based graphic design program I can take elements that I created here and import it into the app plus it’s much easier to build your app by creating what it would actually look like as it appears on the screen. Next, you’ll need to download JDK (Java Development Kit) along with Android Studio and SDK tools which are both free online then select the android release you’ll be programing for, what google suggests Android 8.0 (API level 26) from August 1, 2018.  As far as the coding aspect goes I only know the basics but I found a  youtube series by thenewboston to be extremely helpful with learning the Android Studio Interface and Codeacademy to understand the logic of Java. Once you finish your first app you want to test it using Android Studio’s AVD (Android Virtual Devices) then save as a APK plus sign so you can upload the app onto Google Play. Google also requires you to pay a lifetime fee of $25 to create a google play merchant account to add the app to play store. Located below is a Java cheatsheet, please feel free to comment, like and share this article. Located below are some java basics:

  • Data Types are intboolean, and char.
  • Variables are used to store values.
  • Whitespace helps make code easy to read for you and others.
  • Comments describe code and its purpose.
  • Arithmetic Operators include +-*/, and %.
  • Relational Operators include <<=>, and >=.
  • Equality Operators include == and !=.

A boolean is a value with two choices either true or false, yes or no, 1 or 0 for example:

boolean user = true

Operator Description
== Returns true if the expression on the
left evaluates to the same value as the expression on the
right.
!= Returns true if the expression on the
left does not evaluate to the same value as the expression on the
right.
< Returns true if the expression on the
left evaluates to a value that is less than the value of the
expression on the right.
<= Returns true if the expression on the
left evaluates to a value that is less than or equal to the
expression on the right.
> Returns true if the expression on the
left evaluates to a value that is greater than the value of the
expression on the right.
>= Returns true if the expression on the
left evaluates to a value that is greater than or equal to the
expression on the right.

Android Studio Shortcuts 

List by Codeacademy 

Chart by Doug Lowe

 

 

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